5 Natural Household Switches

The average person comes in contact with hundreds of toxic chemicals every day. It’s estimated that most people apply 300 chemicals to their body every single day! The biggest contributors to toxic chemicals in our homes are from fabric softener, dryer sheets, air freshener plug-ins, and candles. Yuck!

The volatile chemicals found in conventional cleaning products often linger in the air after you use them in your home, and enter the body through the lungs. They are also absorbed into the body though the skin, or even ingested from cleaning residue left on cutlery and dishes.

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Once these chemicals get into your body, they can cause a whole lot of damage, especially when we’re exposed to them over a long period of time. Many of them are endocrine disruptors, hormone disruptors, carcinogens… and others cause asthma! 

Here’s the thing: We’re all just doing our best to have a healthy, happy & clean home. No one wants to poison their family with toxic chemicals and carcinogens!

Don’t wait until you’re sick to start ditching the chemicals. Even if you can start with these 5 easy switches, you’ll be off to a good start with ridding your home of toxins.

It’s time to take charge of your health: start ditching the toxins, and switching to cleaner alternatives!

Here’s your first piece of homework: Start reading labels! Like really reading. Turn over your cleaning products & cosmetics and actually read whats in there. I’ll give you a list of chemicals to look out for below, but if you want to make it even simpler you can also download the Think DirtyThink Dirty app onto your smartphone. It will allow you to scan barcodes with your camera, and give you a rating on a scale of 1-10 if the product is dirty or clean. it even breaks down the ingredients and tells you why they are harmful.

Here’s a list of toxic chemicals to look out for when you’re reading labels:

  • 2-Butoxyethanol (2-BE, also known as butyl cellosolve)
  • Ammonia
  • Coal tar dyes
  • MEA (monoethanalomine)
  • DEA (diethanolamine)
  • TEA (triethanolamine)
  • Fragrance chemicals
  • Nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs)
  • Phosphates
  • Silica powder
  • Sodium dichloroisocyanurate dihydrate
  • Sodium hydroxide (also known as lye and caustic soda)
  • Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and sodium laureth sulfate (SLES)
  • Triclosan
  • Trisodium nitrilotriacetate

Ok so now that you are reading labels… Let’s get those toxic products out of your house. Here’s 5 Natural Household Switches you should make right away!

1. Fabric Softener & Dryer Sheets… Meet wool dryer balls!

Since fabric softener and dryer sheets are some of the most toxic products out there, why not ditch them first?! Honestly, this is such an easy switch: wool dryer balls last for a really long time and you’ll find them in packs of 2 or 3 at your local health food store. They last for up to 1000 loads, so after the initial investment all you have to do is throw them in the dryer! If you’d like, you can add a couple drops of essential oils to them for extra fresh and amazing smelling laundry. No synthetic fragrances here!

2. Air Freshener Plugins & Sprays

If you have these in your home: believe me when I say that they cause asthma attacks! One whiff of air freshener spray will have me coughing and struggling for a deep breath. Here’s the good news: essential oil diffusers are all the rage! Haven’t you heard? Not only do they smell amazing, but they are also great for supporting your respiratory system. Invest in a good ultrasonic diffuser and some pure essential oils. You can run it in the kitchen to clear the air, or even beside your bed at night to help get a good night’s sleep.

Essential oils for emotional wellness: take this quiz to find the right essential oil for you!

3. All Purpose Cleaner

Stop spending boat loads of money on 10 “different kinds” of cleaners for each part of your home. It’s so easy to make a natural, all purpose cleaner with just a few simple ingredients. Here’s my favourite recipe for all purpose cleaner:

  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 cup white vinegar
  • 1 tbsp castile soap
  • 10 drops thieves essential oil
  • 10 drops lemon essential oil

Shake it up, pour in a spray bottle, and get scrubbing!

4. Deodorant

The big concern with conventional deodorant and antiperspirant is the aluminum, parabens, and synthetic fragrances that they most often contain. Look for one that’s aluminum free at your local health food store. Or try making your own with this simple recipe!

5. Dishsoap / Shampoo / Bodywash / Handsoap

Some of the chemicals often found in soaps include: sodium laurel sulphate (SLS), fragrance chemicals, ammonium laurel sulphate, triclosan, and phosphates. When you see these ingredients read between the lines… what you’re actually getting is: endocrine disruptors, carcinogens, skin irritant, eye irritant, and hormone disruptors.

There is a better way! Start reading the labels on your products and be selective with what you bring into your home. Only 15% of all the chemicals out there have health and safety data. So many of these products have harmful properties that we don’t even know about, and the companies making them fail to inform us of the risks. Take a look in your local health food store, and search for soap products that have a list of ingredients you can actually read and understand. There are some great options out there that do the job even better than conventional cleaning products. Remember: the Think Dirty app is your friend, and will help you distinguish between clean and dirty choices!

You’re already on your way to a healthier, chemical free home.

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One thought on “5 Natural Household Switches

  1. Hi Jasmine,

    I am trying to slowly phase out all the toxic chemicals and non organic food out of our lives. I’ve recently started using essential oils to treat different ailments my kids have been experiencing. However, I have been using doterra and young living. I can’t seem to make a decision on which company to stick with. What made you decide to go with young living oils and what would you recommend and why?

    Thanks,
    Bhavisha Patel

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